Round the Block.

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Hello, friends!
We’ve continued our route through the northwest and now find ourselves in Broome, a city we’ve heard of in lore because of its international influences, hippie haven-qualities, and picturesque beaches. And indeed, it’s the first Chinatown we’ve found since Vietnam! The pearling industry brought Asian workers here in droves, and we’ve come across funky vegetables and snacks galore that we feel very in-the-know to recognize. And indeed, the beach is spectacular. Also, the first time we’ve swam in the ocean since Indonesia because of the crocodiles and jellyfish which haunt the north coast of Australia.

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Behold, the boab tree. An icon of NW Oz, the boab looks like something Dr. Seuss would have drawn. Boab trees swell with stored water used to withstand drought. When a bush fire comes through, it sheds its outer, burned layer of bark like a snake. Large boab trees in Australia can be thousands of years old. Below, the prison boab – it’s hollow centre used as a jail cell in cattle-rancher days.

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Now on the job hunt more forcefully, we’ve still been able to do some walks, visit some lakes, and admire cool rock formations.

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In the Kimberleys, the landscape changes in a heartbeat. Huge cliffs and gorges with lush stream gullies pass away into flat dry land, then into a completely different kind of rock in a matter of minutes.

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The bush fire we drove through. As in, we could see flames on the side of the road and small birds got confused and flew into us. (Don’t worry, Mom, small flames.)

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J fishing at the Ord River.
Also. Also. More cool bug photos.

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Technicolor beetles.

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Technicolor dragonfly.

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Yes, these ants are killing a fly. There are two to three ants to each leg and wing to immobilize, then more crawling on top to finish him off. Yes, we sat and watched for awhile. Yes, J might have gotten excited and fed them flies.

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So I know I’ve posted a lot of photos of termites, but I just found out that for some aboriginal tribes,  the dead are traditionally interred inside a termite mound. A space is hallowed out, the body put inside, and the termites build around it to close the hole. Cool.

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Lots of love!!
C and J

PS: just for the record books,

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One thought on “Round the Block.

  1. Hi Clara! I love your fun stories and beautiful photos … especially of insects dismembering each other. Couldn’t quite read the sign in the last pic. Keep on trucking! Love, Dad

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